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GAISER TOOL COMPANY

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GAISER SMALL WIRE WEDGE INFORMATION   

7. BACK RADIUS PAGE 2 (2)

GTC Figure 43-17

Figure 17. This bond was made with a 2160-2525-L-PFR-PBR (polished front radius and polished back radius) wedge. Designed to help reduce aluminum build-up from occurring, the PFR and PBR options provide a smooth appearance at the heel of the 1st bond and the toe of the 2nd bond. The PBR can also aide in reducing heel cracks.  

GTC Figure 44-18

Figure 18. This bond is a typical lead bond. The length of the tail is minimal because the wire is terminated at this bond. The back radius of the tool is designed to produce a good transition on the first bond and a relatively sharp transition on the second bond to allow the wire to break easily.  

There are two techniques used to terminate the wire after the lead bond. These techniques are bonding machine dependent and are commonly called the  

table-tear method and the clamp-tear method. All deep access bonders and some conventional bonders utilizes the table tear method.

GTC Figure 44-19

Figure 19. This type of bond may result when the BR does not break the wire correctly: a smashed bond occurs because there is not sufficient tail length under the bond. There must be enough wire under the FR and the BR to equalize the extrusion forces during bonding. Otherwise, overbonding and/or a weak heel may occur. 

GTC Figure 44-20

Figure 20. This bond was formed with a cermet tipped deep access wedge on a clamp tear bonder. After the second bond is complete, the clamp moves up, terminating the wire at the back radius. The clamp then moves down, forcing the wire to feed out. This leaves the tail under the bond foot for the next bond. The clamp tear deep access bonders do not leave any nicks in the wire. 

(Device: courtesy MEI)

GTC Figure 44-21

Figure 21. For some deep access bonders, the clamp is closed after the second bond. The tool then moves upward to break the tail. Note the dent or nick in the wire caused by the BR during termination. 

There are two techniques used to terminate the wire after the lead bond. These techniques are bonding machine dependent and are commonly called the  

table-tear method and the clamp-tear method. All deep access bonders and some conventional bonders utilizes the table tear method.

GTC Figure 44-22

Figure 22. p/n 2160-1515-L-F-CER is designed for gold wire. The BR comes standard at 0.0006in./15m but is available smaller.

(Photo: courtesy DPA Labs Inc.) 

GTC Figure 44-23

Figure 23. These first bonds were made with 0.001in./25 aluminum wire. If the tailing is inconsistent, a smaller BR is required. 

(Device: courtesy MEI)

GTC Figure 45-24

Figure 24. The cross-groove modification is commonly recommended with gold wire. The BR must be sharp enough and the BL long enough for the wire to terminate correctly. If the BR is too large or the BL is too short, the wire will have a tendency to terminate at the CG. When this happens, the 2nd bond will be short and the 1st bond will have an extra-long tail.

GTC Figure 45-25

Figure 25. This first bond, made with 0.001in.25 gold wire and a wedge having a zero BR. The BL on this wedge was 0.0005in./13m.

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Last modified: 2017-11-09